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HOLIDAY HOURS AT THE AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUMJust a reminder, we will be open on Wednesday, Nov. 24th but we will be closed on Thanksgiving Day - Thursday, Nov. 25th. We will be OPEN on Friday, Nov. 26th and open through the weekend (11/27-11/28) - so, if you're looking for an activity for visiting family, please make the AHM a destination!Another reminder that the AHM will be CLOSED to the general public on Saturday, December 4th and will be only open to ticket holders for the WWII Symposium that day. For more details about that event (tickets on sale until Nov 26) at www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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Saturday, December 4th, the American Heritage Museum will host a WWII symposium: Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy? The P-40 Tomahawk - world's last fully restored and flying fighter that survived the attack on Pearl Harbor - will be the backdrop. This is an exclusive catered event with a stellar line-up of speakers. Deadline for tickets is Friday, November 26th. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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We hope you will join us at the AHM this Friday for a talk by author Dr. Steven Eames on his book Rustic Warriors. Starts at 1:00 PM. Standard museum admission. For more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/speaker-series-rustic-warrior-by-dr-steven-eames/ ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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The American Heritage Museum welcomes our veteran community this coming Thursday, November 11th, in celebration of Veterans Day. Museum admission is free on Veterans Day for all veterans and active duty personnel from 10:00am to 5:00pm on Thursday. Please bring your VA ID card or DoD DD 214/215 for verification. Please join us at 11:00am for a special ceremony in the museum in remembrance of all who have served. Advance purchase of tickets is not necessary, please purchase or verify admission at the front desk. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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*Special Event:WWII Symposium at AHM - December 4th.Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy?On December 7th, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor. The assault would plunge the United States into a second world war that ultimately resulted in the deaths of over 418,000 Americans and an unfathomable 70 to 80 million worldwide. Coined by President Roosevelt as the “day of infamy,” the attack on Pearl Harbor and declarations of war on the United States four days later by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy propelled the United States into a war on two sides of the world – the Pacific and European theaters.Now, 80 years later, the attacks on Pearl Harbor still invoke feelings of patriotism and sadness. Our country changed forever after December 7th, 1941. The history that leads to this pivotal moment and its aftermath continues to affect our world’s nations, democracies, and civic order.The American Heritage Museum will host an extraordinary symposium called “Pearl Harbor – Inevitable or Infamy.” During this exclusive day-long discussion we will explore what lead up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the major battles that ensued and its aftermath.This is a special event exclusive to symposium participants. Lunch will be served as well as coffee and refreshments and personal tours through the amazing American Heritage Museum are part of the event. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago  ·  

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Gulf War


M551 Sheridan
– USA | AMPHIBIOUS TANK

M60A1 – USA | TANK

T-55 – IRAQ | TANK

SS-1C Scud-B (R-17/R-300 Elbrus) & MAZ-543  – IRAQ | MISSILE & LAUNCHER

ZSU-23-4 SHILKA – IRAQ | ANTI-AIRCRAFT TANK

2S1 GVOZDIKA – IRAQ | SELF PROPELLED HOWITZER

Persian Gulf War
Though the long-running Iran-Iraq War had ended in a United Nations-brokered ceasefire in August 1988, by mid-1990 the two states had yet to begin negotiating a permanent peace treaty. When their foreign ministers met in Geneva that July, prospects for peace suddenly seemed bright, as it appeared that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was prepared to dissolve that conflict and return territory that his forces had long occupied. Two weeks later, however, Hussein delivered a speech in which he accused neighboring nation Kuwait of siphoning crude oil from the Ar-Rumaylah oil fields located along their common border. He insisted that Kuwait and Saudi Arabia cancel out $30 billion of Iraq’s foreign debt, and accused them of conspiring to keep oil prices low in an effort to pander to Western oil-buying nations.

Realizing Iraq’s debt would not be forgiven and his ability to control and sell oil was in jeopardy, Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion and occupation of neighboring Kuwait in early August 1990. Shocked by these actions, fellow Arab powers such as Saudi Arabia and Egypt called on the United States and other Western nations to intervene. Hussein defied United Nations Security Council demands to withdraw from Kuwait by mid-January 1991, and the Persian Gulf War began with a massive U.S.-led air offensive known as Operation Desert Storm. After 42 days of relentless attacks by the allied coalition in the air and on the ground, U.S. President George H.W. Bush declared a cease-fire on February 28; by that time, most Iraqi forces in Kuwait had either surrendered or fled. Though the Persian Gulf War was initially considered an unqualified success for the international coalition, simmering conflict in the troubled region led to a second Gulf War, known as the Iraq War, that began in 2003.

Iraq War
In 2002, the new U.S. president, George W. Bush, argued that the vulnerability of the United States following the September 11 attacks of 2001, combined with Iraq’s alleged continued possession and manufacture of weapons of mass destruction and its support for terrorist groups – which, according to the Bush administration, included al-Qaeda, the perpetrators of the September 11 attacks—made disarming Iraq a renewed priority (both accusations proved erroneous).

When Hussein refused to relinquish his leadership and leave Iraq, U.S. and allied forces launched an attack on the morning of March 19, 2003. The United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiated war on Iraq. Just after explosions began to rock Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, U.S. President George W. Bush announced in a televised address, “At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.” President Bush and his advisors built much of their case for war on the idea that Iraq, under dictator Saddam Hussein, possessed or was in the process of building weapons of mass destruction.

No active major weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq. The U.S. declared an end to the war in Iraq on December 15, 2011, nearly ten years after the fighting began. The American forces suffered over 4,000 combat deaths and over 32,000 wounded during the Iraq War. It is estimated that somewhere between 7,400 to 20,000 civilians had been killed, primarily by U.S. air-and-ground forces.

 

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OPEN INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND - Open Saturday, July 3rd and Sunday, July 4th from 10am to 5pm Daily

No Reservations Needed.