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The American Heritage Museum will be open all week from April 15-21 from 10am to 5pm daily for MA Spring Break Week! The Highland Street Foundation is providing free admission to the museum on Tuesday, April 16 for all visitors too! (no registration required). For all other days, save $2 per ticket by buying your tickets online at: ahmus.me/save2..#museum #familyfun #PatriotsDay #historymuseum #boston #visitma #WeAreMetroWest #metrowestma #metrowestboston #hudsonma #thingstodoinboston ... See MoreSee Less
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The American Heritage Museum will welcome a new addition to our Pacific Theater gallery in July - the Grumman / General Motors FM-2 Wildcat BuNo 57039 currently under an amazing restoration effort by the volunteers and staff of the Air Zoo in Kalamazoo, MI. The Wildcat will be on long-term loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum and will be unveiled during our WWII in the Pacific Re-Enactment Weekend on July 13-14. Read the full story: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/2024/04/american-heritage-museum-to-welcome-newly-restored-general... ... See MoreSee Less
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Reminder - We are hosting a terrific presentation and special tour by Gregg Pomerleau this Friday, March 29th, 1 to 4 p.m. Gregg is an AHM docent and former Master Gunner and tank platoon Sergeant.Hear Gregg discuss the history and technologies of tanks and how the concepts of building a better tank has advanced over the millennia. As part of this special presentation, Gregg will take participants on a personal tour through the American Heritage Museum’s collection to point out specific features on the tanks that he is highlighting in his talk. More information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/special-presentation-tank-technologies/ ... See MoreSee Less
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See our new American Heritage Museum shorts Youtube video channel hosted by the dynamic brothers Andrew and Matthew Ford. Here they feature compelling videos about the finer details in AHM's collection. Some of their segments include how to operate a M3 GMC gun breech, background on the Borgward B IV, why the IS-2's gun is so large and many more. See: www.youtube.com/channel/UCmqC1zBHV0EWZtdEQEhRCww or @AmericanHeritageMuseumShorts. ... See MoreSee Less
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Gulf War


M551 Sheridan
– USA | AMPHIBIOUS TANK

M60A1 – USA | TANK

T-55 – IRAQ | TANK

SS-1C Scud-B (R-17/R-300 Elbrus) & MAZ-543  – IRAQ | MISSILE & LAUNCHER

ZSU-23-4 SHILKA – IRAQ | ANTI-AIRCRAFT TANK

2S1 GVOZDIKA – IRAQ | SELF PROPELLED HOWITZER

Persian Gulf War
Though the long-running Iran-Iraq War had ended in a United Nations-brokered ceasefire in August 1988, by mid-1990 the two states had yet to begin negotiating a permanent peace treaty. When their foreign ministers met in Geneva that July, prospects for peace suddenly seemed bright, as it appeared that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was prepared to dissolve that conflict and return territory that his forces had long occupied. Two weeks later, however, Hussein delivered a speech in which he accused neighboring nation Kuwait of siphoning crude oil from the Ar-Rumaylah oil fields located along their common border. He insisted that Kuwait and Saudi Arabia cancel out $30 billion of Iraq’s foreign debt, and accused them of conspiring to keep oil prices low in an effort to pander to Western oil-buying nations.

Realizing Iraq’s debt would not be forgiven and his ability to control and sell oil was in jeopardy, Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion and occupation of neighboring Kuwait in early August 1990. Shocked by these actions, fellow Arab powers such as Saudi Arabia and Egypt called on the United States and other Western nations to intervene. Hussein defied United Nations Security Council demands to withdraw from Kuwait by mid-January 1991, and the Persian Gulf War began with a massive U.S.-led air offensive known as Operation Desert Storm. After 42 days of relentless attacks by the allied coalition in the air and on the ground, U.S. President George H.W. Bush declared a cease-fire on February 28; by that time, most Iraqi forces in Kuwait had either surrendered or fled. Though the Persian Gulf War was initially considered an unqualified success for the international coalition, simmering conflict in the troubled region led to a second Gulf War, known as the Iraq War, that began in 2003.

Iraq War
In 2002, the new U.S. president, George W. Bush, argued that the vulnerability of the United States following the September 11 attacks of 2001, combined with Iraq’s alleged continued possession and manufacture of weapons of mass destruction and its support for terrorist groups – which, according to the Bush administration, included al-Qaeda, the perpetrators of the September 11 attacks—made disarming Iraq a renewed priority (both accusations proved erroneous).

When Hussein refused to relinquish his leadership and leave Iraq, U.S. and allied forces launched an attack on the morning of March 19, 2003. The United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiated war on Iraq. Just after explosions began to rock Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, U.S. President George W. Bush announced in a televised address, “At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.” President Bush and his advisors built much of their case for war on the idea that Iraq, under dictator Saddam Hussein, possessed or was in the process of building weapons of mass destruction.

No active major weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq. The U.S. declared an end to the war in Iraq on December 15, 2011, nearly ten years after the fighting began. The American forces suffered over 4,000 combat deaths and over 32,000 wounded during the Iraq War. It is estimated that somewhere between 7,400 to 20,000 civilians had been killed, primarily by U.S. air-and-ground forces.

 

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OPEN SPRING BREAK WEEK - April 15-21

The American Heritage Museum will be open for MA Spring Break Week (April 15-21) including Monday, April 15th and Tuesday, April 16th. Open daily from 10am to 5pm. Free Admission Day on Tuesday, April 16th funded by a grant from the Highland Street Foundation's Spring Week 2024 Program.