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Remembering Pearl Harbor Day is crucial as it marks a pivotal moment in history that shook the world and profoundly influenced global events. This day stands as a poignant reminder of the sacrifices made and the lives lost during the surprise attack on December 7, 1941, a moment that thrust the United States into World War II. Reflecting on this solemn occasion honors the bravery of those who served, acknowledges the impact of war on nations and individuals, and reinforces the importance of vigilance, preparedness, and peacekeeping efforts to prevent such tragedies from occurring again. It serves as a testament to the resilience of a nation and underscores the significance of learning from the past to build a more peaceful future. ... See MoreSee Less
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Join us at the American Heritage Museum Friday, December 8th, for a compelling talk by Vernon Chandler on his epic journey through Europe as he traces the footsteps of his second cousin; Pvt. Kenneth Miller, who was killed in Germany on October 18, 1944.Starts at 2 PM. No reservations needed. ... See MoreSee Less
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How your support will help us in 2024 - We are embarking on one of the most ambitious warbird restoration projects ever with the Junkers Ju-87D-5 Stuka. This project, recovered from a freshwater lake, is under restoration to flying status with multiple workshops in Europe and will be brought to the American Heritage Museum once complete. This infamous dive bomber of WWII will become one of only three complete examples on display anywhere in the world - and is one of only two potential flying restoration projects. Learn more about the project at: ahmus.me/ju87-project and make an impact by making a gift to this project and many others in 2024 with a donation at: ahmus.me/GT2023..#ju87 #stuka #ju87stuka #wwiihistory #warbirds #avgeek #warplanes #worldoftanks #WorldWarII #luftwaffe #livinghistory #GivingTuesday #AmericanHeritageMuseum #aviationhistory ... See MoreSee Less
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How your support helped us in 2023 - Because of your donations on #GivingTuesday this past year, we were able to complete the incredible Hanoi Hilton Vietnam POW exhibit including the real, reconstructed cell from the prison... in time for opening on the 50th Anniversary of Operation Homecoming! Please give today to make an impact in 2024 - do so at: ahmus.me/GT2023..#livinghistory #vietnamwar #hanoihilton #powmia #historymuseum #militaryhistory #visitma #hudsonma #nonprofit ... See MoreSee Less
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Help the American Heritage Museum grow even more in 2024 with a donation for #GivingTuesday! Through the generosity of a group of donors, all donations made now through Midnight on Tuesday, November 28th will be matched, dollar for dollar, up to $25,000. That means, by making your donation over the next two days, your impact on our mission WILL be doubled! Please make your year-end gift and donate online at: ahmus.me/GT2023 ... See MoreSee Less
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Korean War


M7 Priest SPH
– USA | ARTILLERY

M26A1 Pershing – USA | TANK

M24 Chaffee – USA | LIGHT TANK

M39 Armored Utility Vehicle – USA | PRIME MOVER

M2A1 Half Track – USA | HALF-TRACK

M4A3E8 Sherman – USA | TANK

At the end of World War II, the Soviet Union and the United States liberated Korea from imperial Japanese colonial control on August 15th, 1945. After the war had ended, Korea was divided at the 38th parallel into two zones of occupation, the Soviets administered the northern half and the Americans administered the southern half. With the border set at the 38th parallel in 1948, two sovereign states were established because of geopolitical tensions of the Cold War (between the Soviet Union and the United States). A socialist state was established in the north under the communist leadership of Kim Il-sung and a capitalist state in the south under the anti-communist leadership of Syngman Rhee. Both governments of the two new Korean states claimed to be the sole legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither accepted the border as permanent.

The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. This invasion was the first military action of the Cold War. By July, American troops had entered the war on South Korea’s behalf. As far as American officials were concerned, it was a war against the forces of international communism itself. After some early back-and-forth across the 38th parallel, the fighting stalled, and casualties mounted with nothing to show for them. Meanwhile, American officials worked anxiously to fashion some sort of armistice with the North Koreans. The alternative, they feared, would be a wider war with Russia and China–or even, as some warned, World War III. Finally, in July 1953, the Korean War came to an end. In all, some 5 million soldiers and civilians lost their lives in what many in the U.S. refer to as “the Forgotten War” for the lack of attention it received compared to more well-known conflicts like World War I and II and the Vietnam War.

The Korean peninsula would continues to be caught in the Cold War rivalry, but the survival of the Republic of Korea is kept alive the hope of civil liberties, democracy, economic development, and eventual unification. There is little desire from North Korea for peace or reunification .

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Open Friday, November 24th!

The American Heritage Museum is open Friday, November 24th, the day after Thanksgiving, from 10am to 5pm and will also be open Saturday and Sunday. Bring your family and friends who are in town for the holiday weekend!