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New update from Sweden this week of our 1917 Nieuport 28 restoration by Mikael Carlson - www.americanheritagemuseum.org/2021/07/nieuport-28-restoration-july-2021/ - test assembly before fabric covering! Full article and gallery of photos in the link below. The sole original flying example of America's first fighter is getting closer to the skies! ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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July 19, 1944: Breakthrough at Saint-LôHedgerows, Rhinos and CrocodilesThe Battle of Saint-Lô is one of the three conflicts in the battle of the hedgerows which took place between July 7 and July 19, 1944. Saint-Lô had been taken by the Germans in 1940 and after D-Day, the Americans had targeted the city as a strategic crossroads.After the battle of the Normandy beaches, Allied forces found themselves engaged in the battle of the hedgerows. Thanks to the success of the airborne landings, the flanks of the beachhead were firmly held, but efforts to break out of the center were frustrated by fierce German resistance and counterattack. Fighting inshore, the Allies also encountered difficulty in the dense hedgerow country known to the French as bocage. Aerial reconnaissance photos had not revealed the denseness of these packed embankments upon which the hedgerows grew. The bocage proved to be a defenders paradise and an attacker's hell.A simple conversion to US tanks helped defeat the hedgerow problems. In July 1944, tankers began welding iron beams - often using cut-up German "hedgehog" shore defenses - to the front of Sherman tanks. The tanks, nicknamed "Rhinos," could then drive directly at the hedgerow and plow through the mass of earth and vegetation. The invention of the device is credited to Curtis Culin, a sergeant in the 2nd Armored Division's 102nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron.The British did the job with fire. The Crocodile was a flame-throwing variant of the British Churchill tank developed under Major General Sir Percy Hobart in 1943. The Crocodile had a flame projector that replaced the front mounted machine gun and was connected to an armored trailer via an armored pipe mounted along the underside of the tank. The trailer carried 1800 liters of fuel as well as a compressed propellant which was enough for 80 one-second blasts.The American Heritage Museum is proud to display a British Churchill Crocodile (pictured) and a number of Sherman tanks. ... See MoreSee Less

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#1 Best-Selling Author Andrew Biggio to hold first book signing of WWII novel "The Rifle" at the American Heritage Museum on August 1st. In what could be one of the last largest WWII Veteran reunions, some 40+ WWII Veterans are expected to attend. Each veteran took part in the rifle project, and plan to sign books along with the author for hundreds of guests.Fifteen French Legion of Honor Medals will be presented to veterans ranging from ages 95-105 for their service liberating Europe. The 22nd Director of the Army National Guard, General Jon Jensen will be the guest speaker, along with Marine Corps Colonel Christopher Landro.Books are guaranteed to be signed by the author, WWII veterans until they feel free to stop.Event is scheduled from 3pm- 6pm. $30.00 per book, $20.00 if you bring your own copy. Standard museum admission to attend. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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Join us here at the AHM this Saturday 7/17, 1:00 PM, for a discussion by author Elizabeth Macalaster about winged couriers in the U.S. Military. Fascinating subject covered by an extraordinary woman. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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Battle for Berlin


IS-2 Iosef Stalin
– RUS | TANK

SU-100 – RUS | TANK DESTROYER

Messerschmitt ME-109G-10 – GER | AIRCRAFT – FIGHTER

The Battle of Berlin, designated the Berlin Strategic Offensive Operation by the Soviet Union, was one of the last major offensives of the European theater of World War II. On April 16th, 1945 massive Soviet forces attacked from the north, east and south. Over the course of the next week, the Red Army gradually took the entire city. The forces available for the city’s defense included roughly 45,000 soldiers in several severely depleted German Army and Waffen-SS divisions. These divisions were supplemented by the police force, boys in the compulsory Hitler Youth, WWI veterans and women’s auxiliary units. Knowing his inevitable fate, Hitler committed suicide on April 30th in an underground Berlin bunker. The city’s garrison surrendered on May 2nd, but fighting continued to the north-west, west, and south-west of the city until the end of the war in Europe with the German formal surrender to the Western Allies on May 8th and to the Soviet Union, in a separate ceremony, on May 9th.

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OPEN INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND - Open Saturday, July 3rd and Sunday, July 4th from 10am to 5pm Daily

No Reservations Needed.