header.php

Our nation has a long and proud history of Americans answering the call to serve. Today, we pause to remember the 138,000 POW’s and 83,000 MIA’s from WWII to the present day during this, America’s National POW/MIA Recognition Day.

The American Heritage Museum is humbled to have been chosen to display a somber reminder of perhaps the most well-known of all of the POW camps in Vietnam, the Hỏa Lò Prison or as it is more colloquially known as the “Hanoi Hilton.”

With great foresight and appreciation of the historic significance of these cells a donor made sure that the most important of these cells were disassembled, brick by brick, slab by slab, and preserved for posterity before the remaining parts of the prison were raised in the mid-1990s.

Today only a handful of these cells survive at the original Hanoi Hilton along with the ones that will be carefully reassembled at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson, Ma. This portion of the “Hilton” known as “Heartbreak Hotel” was the section where most of the downed flyers spent their first weeks of captivity, enduring the peak of their horrific and grueling physical and mental torture. We are solemnly committed to ensuring the personal war for survival and sacrifice of these brave men shall never be forgotten.

The AHM is honored to be able to keep their legacy alive for future generations and look forward to the future opening of this gallery that will preserve their courage, valor, and bravery.
... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook

We will never forget. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Celebrating the 75th Victory Over Japan day (VJ day). Honoring those who served and lost their lives for our freedom and liberty. We must remember. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook

We have been making some interesting discoveries as we assemble the Panzer 1A. Pictures show the left rear swing arm with a bullet hole right through it. Looks like the bullet traveled through the arm and into a wheel rim. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Restoration work is being done on the German 7.5mm IG18 artillery piece that will go into the War Clouds exhibit around the end of this week. The wooden spoke wheels indicate this cannon was pulled by a horse. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook

North Africa


M3 Lee
– USA | TANK

Matilda MK.II – UK | TANK

Sd.Kfz 10 1-Ton – GER | PERSONNEL CARRIER/PRIME MOVER

Leichter Panzerspähwagen SdKfz 222 – GER | SCOUT ARMORED CAR

BMW R75 & Sidecar – GER | MOTORCYCLE & SIDE CAR

7.5 cm Pak 40 – GER | ANTI-TANK GUN

The North African Campaign of the Second World War started June 10th, 1940, when Fascist Italy declared war on Britain and France. It lasted until May 13th, 1943, when the last Axis troops in Africa surrendered in Tunisia, including the defeated Afrika Korps sent by Hitler to prop up his faltering Italian ally.

The United States officially entered the war against Germany on December 11, 1941. Struggling against Japan while arming and training its brand new mass armies in haste, the United States began direct military assistance to Allied forces in North Africa on May 11th, 1942. Canada provided a small contingent of 348 officers and enlisted. Australians, Indians, and South Africans also fought under British command in Egypt and Libya, where Britain’s 8th Army and the ‘Desert Rats’ were led by General Montgomery. Meanwhile, Free French forces struck out for North Africa from deep inside West Africa, as the Allies sought to drive the Axis out of Africa as a preliminary to the invasion of Italy and Germany.

The training, build-up, and transport of green American forces took time. While tanks and troops were supplied to the British, large numbers of American troops did not arrive in North Africa to join in the Allied effort until the start of Operation Torch in November, 1942. With some American material assistance, including tanks and aircraft and intelligence assets, British and Commonwealth forces fought the Axis in campaigns in the Libyan and Egyptian deserts (Western Desert Campaign). Anglo-American landings in Morocco and Algeria (Operation Torch), as well as Tunisia (Tunisia Campaign) book-ended a coordinated Allied strategy of driving and squeezing the last Axis armies in North Africa from east and west, until their total defeat and surrender in Tunisia May 1943.

The battle for North Africa was primarily a struggle for control of the Suez Canal and access to oil from the Middle East and raw materials from Asia, but also an effort to drive Italy out of the war as a prelude to invasion of southern Europe and a planned bombing campaign against Germany. It was the place German and American armies first faced off against each other. After early and terrible losses to the Germans, soldiers from America joined the ongoing Allied effort in North Africa and helped turn the tide of war decisively against the Axis. Next would come landings in Sicily and southern Italy. Based in a secured North Africa, bombers and invading armies would next bring the war home to the heartlands of the fascist nations themselves.

footer.php
Museum Re-Opens Wednesday, July 8th, 2020

As a part of the Reopening Massachusetts Phase III, the American Heritage Museum will be re-opening to the public on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 and will be open Wednesday through Sunday from 10am to 5pm. All visitors will be required to wear face masks while visiting the indoor spaces per state requirements.