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Displayed in the Gulf War Gallery, the 2S1 Gvozdika is a Soviet-design self-propelled 122 mm howitzer AFV that has seen widespread use from 1972 through today. The 2S1 is amphibious & the hull shape is easy to see from this angle. See it and many more tanks and military vehicles at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson, MA - Open Wednesday through Sunday, 10am to 5pm - ahmus.org ... See MoreSee Less

20 hours ago  ·  

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A highlight of the Pacific War Gallery, this Imperial Japanese Army Type 4 "Ho-Ro" 15cm self-propelled gun is the sole survivor of only 12 built. Captured on Luzon in 1945, this unrestored example is on long-term loan from the United States Marine Corps. Visit us Wednesday - Sunday from 10am-5pm daily. Learn more about visiting the American Heritage Museum at ahmus.org ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

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October 3, 1990The Berlin Wall has fallen and Germany is officially reunited!Construction of the Berlin Wall began in August 1961 and by the 1980s, this system of walls and electrified fences - and 55,000 landmines - extended 28 miles through Berlin and 75 miles around West Berlin, separating it from the rest of East Germany. Little is left of the Wall at its original site which was destroyed almost in its entirety.Not all segments of the Wall were ground up as it was being torn down. Many segments can be found at various institutions around the world - including the American Heritage Museum.Come see our very own piece of the "Mauer" this weekend at the Battle for the Airfield. Your admission fee entitles you to see all the Museum's collections. ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

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Developed from the Soviet T-34, the SU-100 tank destroyer added a 100mm D-10S gun to penetrate most German armor until the Tiger II during World War II. It remained in Soviet production until 1947 and in Czech production until the 1960's. See it at the American Heritage Museum in the "Battle for Berlin" Gallery as part of the WWII section. Museum open 10am-5pm, Wed-Sun. Learn more at www.americanheritagemuseum.org ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago  ·  

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The White M3 Scout Car is an American-built, open top, lightly armored reconnaissance vehicle used throughout WWII. The example in the American Heritage Museum's "Italian Campaign" Gallery is the first military vehicle ever restored by collector Jacques Littlefield. The museum is open 10am-5pm Wed-Sun each week. Visit information at www.americanheritagemuseum.org/plan-your-visit/hours-admission/ ... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago  ·  

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North Africa


M3 Lee
– USA | TANK

Matilda MK.II – UK | TANK

Sd.Kfz 10 1-Ton – GER | PERSONNEL CARRIER/PRIME MOVER

Leichter Panzerspähwagen SdKfz 222 – GER | SCOUT ARMORED CAR

BMW R75 & Sidecar – GER | MOTORCYCLE & SIDE CAR

7.5 cm Pak 40 – GER | ANTI-TANK GUN

The North African Campaign of the Second World War started June 10th, 1940, when Fascist Italy declared war on Britain and France. It lasted until May 13th, 1943, when the last Axis troops in Africa surrendered in Tunisia, including the defeated Afrika Korps sent by Hitler to prop up his faltering Italian ally.

The United States officially entered the war against Germany on December 11, 1941. Struggling against Japan while arming and training its brand new mass armies in haste, the United States began direct military assistance to Allied forces in North Africa on May 11th, 1942. Canada provided a small contingent of 348 officers and enlisted. Australians, Indians, and South Africans also fought under British command in Egypt and Libya, where Britain’s 8th Army and the ‘Desert Rats’ were led by General Montgomery. Meanwhile, Free French forces struck out for North Africa from deep inside West Africa, as the Allies sought to drive the Axis out of Africa as a preliminary to the invasion of Italy and Germany.

The training, build-up, and transport of green American forces took time. While tanks and troops were supplied to the British, large numbers of American troops did not arrive in North Africa to join in the Allied effort until the start of Operation Torch in November, 1942. With some American material assistance, including tanks and aircraft and intelligence assets, British and Commonwealth forces fought the Axis in campaigns in the Libyan and Egyptian deserts (Western Desert Campaign). Anglo-American landings in Morocco and Algeria (Operation Torch), as well as Tunisia (Tunisia Campaign) book-ended a coordinated Allied strategy of driving and squeezing the last Axis armies in North Africa from east and west, until their total defeat and surrender in Tunisia May 1943.

The battle for North Africa was primarily a struggle for control of the Suez Canal and access to oil from the Middle East and raw materials from Asia, but also an effort to drive Italy out of the war as a prelude to invasion of southern Europe and a planned bombing campaign against Germany. It was the place German and American armies first faced off against each other. After early and terrible losses to the Germans, soldiers from America joined the ongoing Allied effort in North Africa and helped turn the tide of war decisively against the Axis. Next would come landings in Sicily and southern Italy. Based in a secured North Africa, bombers and invading armies would next bring the war home to the heartlands of the fascist nations themselves.

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MUSEUM CLOSING AT 3:00PM TODAY (Sat. June 4th)

The American Heritage Museum will be closing early at 3:00pm today, Saturday, June 4th, for a private event. The museum will be open normal hours (10am to 5pm) on Sunday, June 5th.