header.php
Come on out to the American Heritage Museum on Halloween Day, Sunday, October 31st from 10am to 5pm for Tank or Treat at the Museum! Trick or Treating with candy at your favorite tanks, activities, and photo opportunities galore! Any kids in costume get free admission with at least one adult / veteran / senior standard admission. See more at: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/tank-or-treat-halloween-at-the-american-heritage-museum/ ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook
Please join us at the American Heritage Museum this Friday, October 22nd for an interesting talk on the botanical history of WWII. No reservations needed. Standard admission. More information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/speaker-series-plants-go-to-war-a-botanical-history-of-world... ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago  ·  

View on Facebook
The American Heritage Museum wishes to thank ALL of our visitors to the 2021 Battle for the Airfield World War II Re-Enactment weekend for experiencing a fantastic weekend of living history with us here in Hudson/Stow, MA! It was one of the best event weekends we have had and we thank everyone for making it a safe and fun event after a challenging year for all of us.A special thank you goes out to our volunteer re-enactors from all over the region who share their time, collections, and knowledge with all of us. Their passion for keeping history alive is clearly evident through their dedication to accurately portraying veterans from World War II on both the Allied and Axis sides. Without their help, the Battle for the Airfield truly would not be possible. And last, but certainly not least, a well deserved thank you goes out to the volunteers and staff of the American Heritage Museum. Their tireless support in planning, setting up, staffing, and cleaning up after all of our special event weekends each season is truly incredible. Thank you for your dedication to our mission and being here to answer the call. Just like a tank cannot fight without the crew; the museum could not operate without our volunteers... We look forward to a wonderful 2022 season next year with lots of amazing special events here at the American Heritage Museum - we hope to see you ALL here again soon!Photos by John Collins. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook
Starting to pull out some of the armor for this weekend's re-enactment. This will be one for the books! More information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/wwii-re-enactment-battle-for-the-airfield/ ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook

D-Day


Cromwell I –
UK | TANK

                   LCVP “Higgins Boat” – USA | LANDING CRAFT

Churchill Crocodile – UK | FLAME THROWER TANK

QF 6-pounder – UK | ANTI-TANK GUN

Bren Gun Carrier (Universal Carrier) – UK | LIGHT PERSONNEL CARRIER

Allied plans for a cross-Channel invasion of what Hitler called his “Fortress Europe” began to ramp up in 1943. Erwin Rommel took charge of defense operations along the Atlantic coast of occupied Europe. Hitler charged Rommel with completing the so-called Atlantic Wall, a 2,400-mile fortification of bunkers, landmines, beach and water obstacles.

Code-named Operation Overlord, the Battle for Western Europe began on D-Day (June 6th, 1944).  Nearly 156,000 American, British, Canadian, Polish and Free French forces landed on five beaches (two American, two British, one Canadian) along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified coast of France’s Normandy region.

The invasion was one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history and required extensive planning, a huge logistical effort, special feats of engineering, and probably most important, close cooperation among the armies, navies and air forces of all the participating Allied nations. The Normandy landings have been called the beginning of the end of the war in Europe. In fact, they marked the beginning of a new and far more deadly phase, lasting over 11 months.

Operation Neptune – the naval component of Operation Overlord – was organized and commanded by British Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay, the same man who oversaw the 1940 evacuation of the British Expeditionary Forces from the Dunkirk beaches. Neptune would be the largest seaborne invasion in history, only exceeded by the invasion of Okinawa the following year. The invasion fleet was drawn from eight different navies and involved 196,000 naval personnel and 6,939 vessels ranging in size from Higgins boats to battleships.

By dawn on June 6, thousands of paratroopers and glider troops were already on the ground behind enemy lines, securing bridges and exit roads. The amphibious invasions began at 6:30 a.m. The British and Canadians overcame opposition to capture beaches code-named Gold, Sword, and Juno, as did the Americans at Utah Beach. U.S. forces faced the heaviest resistance and most difficult terrain under the cliffs of Omaha Beach, where there were over 2,000 American casualties. However, by day’s end, approximately 156,000 Allied troops had successfully stormed Normandy’s beaches. According to some estimates, more than 4,000 Allied troops lost their lives in the D-Day invasion, with thousands more wounded or missing. Perhaps 6,000 Germans were killed, with many more wounded or surrendering to advancing Allied forces. It took even heavier fighting, against German reinforcements and several Panzer divisions, to secure the Normandy landing sites by June 11.  By the end of August 1944, the Allies had reached the Seine River, Paris was liberated, and the German army was running for the Rhine, abandoning tanks and trucks and other equipment after its bloody defeat at Falaise. But then the Allies went ‘a bridge too far’ in the Netherlands and suffered a hard defeat, and more slogging around Metz. The armies settled into the forests and hills that straddled the Rhine, fighting a slower, more grinding kind of war into the last months of 1944. The war would not be ‘over by Christmas.’ It would continue all winter and into the late spring of 1945.

footer.php

OPEN INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND - Open Saturday, July 3rd and Sunday, July 4th from 10am to 5pm Daily

No Reservations Needed.