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New update from Sweden this week of our 1917 Nieuport 28 restoration by Mikael Carlson - www.americanheritagemuseum.org/2021/07/nieuport-28-restoration-july-2021/ - test assembly before fabric covering! Full article and gallery of photos in the link below. The sole original flying example of America's first fighter is getting closer to the skies! ... See MoreSee Less

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July 19, 1944: Breakthrough at Saint-LôHedgerows, Rhinos and CrocodilesThe Battle of Saint-Lô is one of the three conflicts in the battle of the hedgerows which took place between July 7 and July 19, 1944. Saint-Lô had been taken by the Germans in 1940 and after D-Day, the Americans had targeted the city as a strategic crossroads.After the battle of the Normandy beaches, Allied forces found themselves engaged in the battle of the hedgerows. Thanks to the success of the airborne landings, the flanks of the beachhead were firmly held, but efforts to break out of the center were frustrated by fierce German resistance and counterattack. Fighting inshore, the Allies also encountered difficulty in the dense hedgerow country known to the French as bocage. Aerial reconnaissance photos had not revealed the denseness of these packed embankments upon which the hedgerows grew. The bocage proved to be a defenders paradise and an attacker's hell.A simple conversion to US tanks helped defeat the hedgerow problems. In July 1944, tankers began welding iron beams - often using cut-up German "hedgehog" shore defenses - to the front of Sherman tanks. The tanks, nicknamed "Rhinos," could then drive directly at the hedgerow and plow through the mass of earth and vegetation. The invention of the device is credited to Curtis Culin, a sergeant in the 2nd Armored Division's 102nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron.The British did the job with fire. The Crocodile was a flame-throwing variant of the British Churchill tank developed under Major General Sir Percy Hobart in 1943. The Crocodile had a flame projector that replaced the front mounted machine gun and was connected to an armored trailer via an armored pipe mounted along the underside of the tank. The trailer carried 1800 liters of fuel as well as a compressed propellant which was enough for 80 one-second blasts.The American Heritage Museum is proud to display a British Churchill Crocodile (pictured) and a number of Sherman tanks. ... See MoreSee Less

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#1 Best-Selling Author Andrew Biggio to hold first book signing of WWII novel "The Rifle" at the American Heritage Museum on August 1st. In what could be one of the last largest WWII Veteran reunions, some 40+ WWII Veterans are expected to attend. Each veteran took part in the rifle project, and plan to sign books along with the author for hundreds of guests.Fifteen French Legion of Honor Medals will be presented to veterans ranging from ages 95-105 for their service liberating Europe. The 22nd Director of the Army National Guard, General Jon Jensen will be the guest speaker, along with Marine Corps Colonel Christopher Landro.Books are guaranteed to be signed by the author, WWII veterans until they feel free to stop.Event is scheduled from 3pm- 6pm. $30.00 per book, $20.00 if you bring your own copy. Standard museum admission to attend. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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Join us here at the AHM this Saturday 7/17, 1:00 PM, for a discussion by author Elizabeth Macalaster about winged couriers in the U.S. Military. Fascinating subject covered by an extraordinary woman. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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Pacific War


LVT(A)-4
– USA | LANDING VEHICLE

Type 4 Ho-Ro – JAP | SELF PROPELLED HOWITZER

M4A3 Sherman – USA | TANK

M29 Weasel – USA | PERSONNEL CARRIER

Daimler Mk.2 – UK | ARMORED PERSONNEL CARRIER

M3 A75mm Gun Motor Carriage – USA | HALF-TRACK

Model 97 Towed Gun – JAP | ARTILLERY

Curtiss P-40B Tomahawk – USA | AIRCRAFT – PURSUIT (To be added)

On December 7, 1941, Japan staged a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, severely damaging the US Pacific Fleet. When Germany and Italy declared war on the United States days later, America found itself in a global war. Japan launched a relentless assault that swept through the US territories of Guam, Wake Island, and the Philippines, as well as British-controlled Hong Kong, Malaya, and Burma.

The Pacific Theater was a major theater of the war between the Allies and the Empire of Japan during WWII. It was defined by the Allied powers’ Pacific Ocean Area command, which included most of the Pacific Ocean and its islands, while mainland Asia was excluded, as were the Philippines, the Dutch East Indies, Borneo, Australia, most of the Territory of New Guinea and the western part of the Solomon Islands.

In the Pacific Ocean theater, Japanese forces fought primarily against the United States Navy, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army. The United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and other Allied nations also contributed forces.

The ‘Pacific Theater’ officially came into existence on March 30, 1942, when US Admiral Chester Nimitz was appointed Supreme Allied Commander Pacific Ocean Areas. In the other major theater in the Pacific region, known as the South West Pacific theater, Allied forces were commanded by US General Douglas MacArthur. Both Nimitz and MacArthur were overseen by the US Joint Chiefs and the Western Allies Combined Chiefs of Staff.

Most Japanese forces in the theater were part of the Combined Fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy, which was responsible for all Japanese warships, naval aircraft, and marine infantry units. The Rengō Kantai was led by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, until he was killed in an attack by U.S. fighter planes in April 1943. Yamamoto was succeeded by Admiral Mineichi Koga and Admiral Soemu Toyoda. The General Staff of the Imperial Japanese Army was responsible for Imperial Japanese Army ground and air units in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific.

Though the United States won the last major battle of Okinawa, the American government decided that to keep fighting Japan would cause too many additional deaths. To try and end the war, the United States dropped two atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The blasts killed over 129,000 people and left behind radiation that affected the cities for years after.

On August 15th, 1945, Japan surrendered and, on September 2nd, signed the formal documents to put an end to the war.

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