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Displayed in the Gulf War Gallery, the 2S1 Gvozdika is a Soviet-design self-propelled 122 mm howitzer AFV that has seen widespread use from 1972 through today. The 2S1 is amphibious & the hull shape is easy to see from this angle. See it and many more tanks and military vehicles at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson, MA - Open Wednesday through Sunday, 10am to 5pm - ahmus.org ... See MoreSee Less

20 hours ago  ·  

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A highlight of the Pacific War Gallery, this Imperial Japanese Army Type 4 "Ho-Ro" 15cm self-propelled gun is the sole survivor of only 12 built. Captured on Luzon in 1945, this unrestored example is on long-term loan from the United States Marine Corps. Visit us Wednesday - Sunday from 10am-5pm daily. Learn more about visiting the American Heritage Museum at ahmus.org ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

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October 3, 1990The Berlin Wall has fallen and Germany is officially reunited!Construction of the Berlin Wall began in August 1961 and by the 1980s, this system of walls and electrified fences - and 55,000 landmines - extended 28 miles through Berlin and 75 miles around West Berlin, separating it from the rest of East Germany. Little is left of the Wall at its original site which was destroyed almost in its entirety.Not all segments of the Wall were ground up as it was being torn down. Many segments can be found at various institutions around the world - including the American Heritage Museum.Come see our very own piece of the "Mauer" this weekend at the Battle for the Airfield. Your admission fee entitles you to see all the Museum's collections. ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

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Developed from the Soviet T-34, the SU-100 tank destroyer added a 100mm D-10S gun to penetrate most German armor until the Tiger II during World War II. It remained in Soviet production until 1947 and in Czech production until the 1960's. See it at the American Heritage Museum in the "Battle for Berlin" Gallery as part of the WWII section. Museum open 10am-5pm, Wed-Sun. Learn more at www.americanheritagemuseum.org ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago  ·  

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The White M3 Scout Car is an American-built, open top, lightly armored reconnaissance vehicle used throughout WWII. The example in the American Heritage Museum's "Italian Campaign" Gallery is the first military vehicle ever restored by collector Jacques Littlefield. The museum is open 10am-5pm Wed-Sun each week. Visit information at www.americanheritagemuseum.org/plan-your-visit/hours-admission/ ... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago  ·  

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Pacific War


LVT(A)-4
– USA | LANDING VEHICLE

Type 4 Ho-Ro – JAP | SELF PROPELLED HOWITZER

M4A3 Sherman – USA | TANK

M29 Weasel – USA | PERSONNEL CARRIER

Daimler Mk.2 – UK | ARMORED PERSONNEL CARRIER

M3 A75mm Gun Motor Carriage – USA | HALF-TRACK

Model 97 Towed Gun – JAP | ARTILLERY

Curtiss P-40B Tomahawk – USA | AIRCRAFT – PURSUIT (To be added)

On December 7, 1941, Japan staged a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, severely damaging the US Pacific Fleet. When Germany and Italy declared war on the United States days later, America found itself in a global war. Japan launched a relentless assault that swept through the US territories of Guam, Wake Island, and the Philippines, as well as British-controlled Hong Kong, Malaya, and Burma.

The Pacific Theater was a major theater of the war between the Allies and the Empire of Japan during WWII. It was defined by the Allied powers’ Pacific Ocean Area command, which included most of the Pacific Ocean and its islands, while mainland Asia was excluded, as were the Philippines, the Dutch East Indies, Borneo, Australia, most of the Territory of New Guinea and the western part of the Solomon Islands.

In the Pacific Ocean theater, Japanese forces fought primarily against the United States Navy, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army. The United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and other Allied nations also contributed forces.

The ‘Pacific Theater’ officially came into existence on March 30, 1942, when US Admiral Chester Nimitz was appointed Supreme Allied Commander Pacific Ocean Areas. In the other major theater in the Pacific region, known as the South West Pacific theater, Allied forces were commanded by US General Douglas MacArthur. Both Nimitz and MacArthur were overseen by the US Joint Chiefs and the Western Allies Combined Chiefs of Staff.

Most Japanese forces in the theater were part of the Combined Fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy, which was responsible for all Japanese warships, naval aircraft, and marine infantry units. The Rengō Kantai was led by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, until he was killed in an attack by U.S. fighter planes in April 1943. Yamamoto was succeeded by Admiral Mineichi Koga and Admiral Soemu Toyoda. The General Staff of the Imperial Japanese Army was responsible for Imperial Japanese Army ground and air units in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific.

Though the United States won the last major battle of Okinawa, the American government decided that to keep fighting Japan would cause too many additional deaths. To try and end the war, the United States dropped two atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The blasts killed over 129,000 people and left behind radiation that affected the cities for years after.

On August 15th, 1945, Japan surrendered and, on September 2nd, signed the formal documents to put an end to the war.

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MUSEUM CLOSING AT 3:00PM TODAY (Sat. June 4th)

The American Heritage Museum will be closing early at 3:00pm today, Saturday, June 4th, for a private event. The museum will be open normal hours (10am to 5pm) on Sunday, June 5th.