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Our nation has a long and proud history of Americans answering the call to serve. Today, we pause to remember the 138,000 POW’s and 83,000 MIA’s from WWII to the present day during this, America’s National POW/MIA Recognition Day.

The American Heritage Museum is humbled to have been chosen to display a somber reminder of perhaps the most well-known of all of the POW camps in Vietnam, the Hỏa Lò Prison or as it is more colloquially known as the “Hanoi Hilton.”

With great foresight and appreciation of the historic significance of these cells a donor made sure that the most important of these cells were disassembled, brick by brick, slab by slab, and preserved for posterity before the remaining parts of the prison were raised in the mid-1990s.

Today only a handful of these cells survive at the original Hanoi Hilton along with the ones that will be carefully reassembled at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson, Ma. This portion of the “Hilton” known as “Heartbreak Hotel” was the section where most of the downed flyers spent their first weeks of captivity, enduring the peak of their horrific and grueling physical and mental torture. We are solemnly committed to ensuring the personal war for survival and sacrifice of these brave men shall never be forgotten.

The AHM is honored to be able to keep their legacy alive for future generations and look forward to the future opening of this gallery that will preserve their courage, valor, and bravery.
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2 days ago  ·  

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We will never forget. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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Celebrating the 75th Victory Over Japan day (VJ day). Honoring those who served and lost their lives for our freedom and liberty. We must remember. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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We have been making some interesting discoveries as we assemble the Panzer 1A. Pictures show the left rear swing arm with a bullet hole right through it. Looks like the bullet traveled through the arm and into a wheel rim. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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Restoration work is being done on the German 7.5mm IG18 artillery piece that will go into the War Clouds exhibit around the end of this week. The wooden spoke wheels indicate this cannon was pulled by a horse. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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Defense of the Reich


8.8 cm Flak 36
– GER | ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN

Sd.Kfz. 8 12 TON – GER | PERSONNEL CARRIER/PRIME MOVER

Kommandogerrat 38 – GER | FIRE CONTROL COMPUTER

Flak Battery Generator – GER | ANTI-AIRCRAFT BATTERY SUPPORT

Flak Battery Searchlight – GER | ANTI-AIRCRAFT BATTERY SUPPORT

V-1 (“JB-2 Loon” – Suspended) – GER | GUIDED MISSILE

The Defense of the Reich (also known in German as Reichsverteidigung) was the name given to the strategic defensive aerial campaign fought by the Luftwaffe air arm of the combined Wehrmacht armed forces of Nazi Germany over German-occupied Europe and Nazi Germany during World War II. Its aim was to prevent the destruction of German civilians, military, and civil industries by the Western Allied bombing campaigns. The day and night air battles over Germany during the war involved thousands of aircraft and aerial engagements to counter the Allied strategic bombing campaign. The Luftwaffe fighter force defended the airspace over German-occupied territory against attack, first by RAF Bomber Command and then against the United States Army Air Forces.

The constant night bombing by the RAF and daylight attacks by the USAAF added to the destruction of a major part of the German’s industries and cities, which caused the economy to collapse in the winter of 1944–45. It also pulled nearly two million Germans into defense of the homeland and diverted critical, dual-purpose 88 mm guns from an anti-tank role in the east against the advancing Red Army to an antiaircraft role inside Germany itself. By this time, the Allied armies had reached the German border and the strategic campaign became fused with the tactical battles over the front, while also completing a deliberate and methodical Allied campaign of punishment of all of Germany by destruction of German cities and civilian morale. The air campaign continued until April 1945, when the last strategic bombing missions were flown, ending just before the surrender of Germany on May 8th.

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Museum Re-Opens Wednesday, July 8th, 2020

As a part of the Reopening Massachusetts Phase III, the American Heritage Museum will be re-opening to the public on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 and will be open Wednesday through Sunday from 10am to 5pm. All visitors will be required to wear face masks while visiting the indoor spaces per state requirements.