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Looking for a great museum to visit over February school break week? Visit us at the American Heritage Museum. See some of the world's most rare tanks, armored vehicles and aircraft. Experience the WWI trench, see the Clash of Steel and talk with some of the greatest docents in the world! Open all week, Monday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. www.American Heritage Museum.org ... See MoreSee Less
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The American Heritage Museum will be open all through February school break (next week! 2/19-2/23). Bring the kids for fun scavenger hunts, board games, show and tell and more! ... See MoreSee Less
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The response on our search for Sue Tharp or Sue Thorp from Evansville, IN who worked at Republic Aircraft from 1944-1945 has been tremendous... below is a YouTube video you can share with some video of where her signature is. See it at: ... See MoreSee Less
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As our restoration team in Florida works on the P-47 Thunderbolt restoration, we have uncovered an amazing piece of history that we need your help with! As we removed the components of the turbosupercharger (turbocharger) section in the aft fuselage, we found the name of a "Rosie the Riveter" who likely helped construct the aircraft (P-47D-40-RA s/n 45-49167) in late 1944 at the Republic Aircraft factory in Evansville, IN. We think her name is "Sue Tharp" or "Sue Thorp" with a middle initial of "V"? We'd love to find her, if she is still with us, or her family. Is there anyone from the Evansville, IN area that might know or remember Sue? Any leads, email us at ahm@collingsfoundation.org! ... See MoreSee Less
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Thank you WBZ / CBS News Boston for honoring Holocaust Remembrance Day at the American Heritage Museum on January 27th, underscoring the importance of educating future generations on the horrors that took place before and during WWII. A German rail car from 1913 that was used to transport Holocaust victims sits on display at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson. ... See MoreSee Less
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Crossing the Rhine


M22 Locust
– USA | AIRBORNE TANK

M18 Hellcat – USA | TANK DESTROYER

A34 Comet – UK | CRUISER TANK

Two invasions of France in mid-1944, Operation Overlord in Normandy and Operation Dragoon in southern France, succeeded in moving multiple American and Allied armies to the border of Germany. Attack momentum was delayed in late 1944 by serious logistical issues and by the setback in the Netherlands and fierce German resistance in the Huertgen and Ardennes Forests. But by January 1945, the Western Allies had overwhelmingly superior ground and air forces looming all along the western borders of Germany. The problem was, how to get them over the Rhine, so that they could crush the last German resistance in the ETO and end the war.

By late January 1945, U.S forces, with their British, Canadian, and French allies, had regained the territory lost in December’s Battle of the Bulge and resumed their drive eastward to defeat Hitler’s Third Reich. Only one major obstacle stood in the path of their advance: the Rhine River, whose many bridges had been blown apart by retreating German armies. That forced the Allies to make an amphibious assault into the teeth of German river defenses. This strategic crossing of the Rhine river – also known as Operation Plunder, started on March 23rd, 1945.

When Allied forces reached the Rhine in early March 1945 they found just about every span across the river already destroyed. The one exception of some very important bridges that survived demolition from the Germans such as was a only partly destroyed bridge at Remagen, which was captured in a rush assault. Eisenhower decided that several simultaneous crossings over the 20 mile long battle front would have the greatest chance of success. His plan was to cross the Rhine, then drive into the Ruhr Valley to encircle a large part of the German Army and effectively end German resistance in the west. So began the massive mobilization and movement of engineers, soldiers, equipment and supplies across one of the most important river crossings of WWII.

Four thousand Allied guns fired for four hours during the opening bombardment. British bombers contributed with attacks on Wesel during the day and night of 23 March 1945 – Preparing for this monumental crossing into the heart of Germany.

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OPEN PRESIDENTS DAY WEEK - February 19-25

The American Heritage Museum will be open for Presidents Day Week (February 19-25) including Monday, Feb 19th and Tuesday, Feb 20th. Open daily from 10am to 5pm.