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HOLIDAY HOURS AT THE AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUMJust a reminder, we will be open on Wednesday, Nov. 24th but we will be closed on Thanksgiving Day - Thursday, Nov. 25th. We will be OPEN on Friday, Nov. 26th and open through the weekend (11/27-11/28) - so, if you're looking for an activity for visiting family, please make the AHM a destination!Another reminder that the AHM will be CLOSED to the general public on Saturday, December 4th and will be only open to ticket holders for the WWII Symposium that day. For more details about that event (tickets on sale until Nov 26) at www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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Saturday, December 4th, the American Heritage Museum will host a WWII symposium: Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy? The P-40 Tomahawk - world's last fully restored and flying fighter that survived the attack on Pearl Harbor - will be the backdrop. This is an exclusive catered event with a stellar line-up of speakers. Deadline for tickets is Friday, November 26th. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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We hope you will join us at the AHM this Friday for a talk by author Dr. Steven Eames on his book Rustic Warriors. Starts at 1:00 PM. Standard museum admission. For more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/speaker-series-rustic-warrior-by-dr-steven-eames/ ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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The American Heritage Museum welcomes our veteran community this coming Thursday, November 11th, in celebration of Veterans Day. Museum admission is free on Veterans Day for all veterans and active duty personnel from 10:00am to 5:00pm on Thursday. Please bring your VA ID card or DoD DD 214/215 for verification. Please join us at 11:00am for a special ceremony in the museum in remembrance of all who have served. Advance purchase of tickets is not necessary, please purchase or verify admission at the front desk. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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*Special Event:WWII Symposium at AHM - December 4th.Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy?On December 7th, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor. The assault would plunge the United States into a second world war that ultimately resulted in the deaths of over 418,000 Americans and an unfathomable 70 to 80 million worldwide. Coined by President Roosevelt as the “day of infamy,” the attack on Pearl Harbor and declarations of war on the United States four days later by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy propelled the United States into a war on two sides of the world – the Pacific and European theaters.Now, 80 years later, the attacks on Pearl Harbor still invoke feelings of patriotism and sadness. Our country changed forever after December 7th, 1941. The history that leads to this pivotal moment and its aftermath continues to affect our world’s nations, democracies, and civic order.The American Heritage Museum will host an extraordinary symposium called “Pearl Harbor – Inevitable or Infamy.” During this exclusive day-long discussion we will explore what lead up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the major battles that ensued and its aftermath.This is a special event exclusive to symposium participants. Lunch will be served as well as coffee and refreshments and personal tours through the amazing American Heritage Museum are part of the event. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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Crossing the Rhine


M22 Locust
– USA | AIRBORNE TANK

M18 Hellcat – USA | TANK DESTROYER

A34 Comet – UK | CRUISER TANK

Two invasions of France in mid-1944, Operation Overlord in Normandy and Operation Dragoon in southern France, succeeded in moving multiple American and Allied armies to the border of Germany. Attack momentum was delayed in late 1944 by serious logistical issues and by the setback in the Netherlands and fierce German resistance in the Huertgen and Ardennes Forests. But by January 1945, the Western Allies had overwhelmingly superior ground and air forces looming all along the western borders of Germany. The problem was, how to get them over the Rhine, so that they could crush the last German resistance in the ETO and end the war.

By late January 1945, U.S forces, with their British, Canadian, and French allies, had regained the territory lost in December’s Battle of the Bulge and resumed their drive eastward to defeat Hitler’s Third Reich. Only one major obstacle stood in the path of their advance: the Rhine River, whose many bridges had been blown apart by retreating German armies. That forced the Allies to make an amphibious assault into the teeth of German river defenses. This strategic crossing of the Rhine river – also known as Operation Plunder, started on March 23rd, 1945.

When Allied forces reached the Rhine in early March 1945 they found just about every span across the river already destroyed. The one exception of some very important bridges that survived demolition from the Germans such as was a only partly destroyed bridge at Remagen, which was captured in a rush assault. Eisenhower decided that several simultaneous crossings over the 20 mile long battle front would have the greatest chance of success. His plan was to cross the Rhine, then drive into the Ruhr Valley to encircle a large part of the German Army and effectively end German resistance in the west. So began the massive mobilization and movement of engineers, soldiers, equipment and supplies across one of the most important river crossings of WWII.

Four thousand Allied guns fired for four hours during the opening bombardment. British bombers contributed with attacks on Wesel during the day and night of 23 March 1945 – Preparing for this monumental crossing into the heart of Germany.

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OPEN INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND - Open Saturday, July 3rd and Sunday, July 4th from 10am to 5pm Daily

No Reservations Needed.