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Our nation has a long and proud history of Americans answering the call to serve. Today, we pause to remember the 138,000 POW’s and 83,000 MIA’s from WWII to the present day during this, America’s National POW/MIA Recognition Day.

The American Heritage Museum is humbled to have been chosen to display a somber reminder of perhaps the most well-known of all of the POW camps in Vietnam, the Hỏa Lò Prison or as it is more colloquially known as the “Hanoi Hilton.”

With great foresight and appreciation of the historic significance of these cells a donor made sure that the most important of these cells were disassembled, brick by brick, slab by slab, and preserved for posterity before the remaining parts of the prison were raised in the mid-1990s.

Today only a handful of these cells survive at the original Hanoi Hilton along with the ones that will be carefully reassembled at the American Heritage Museum in Hudson, Ma. This portion of the “Hilton” known as “Heartbreak Hotel” was the section where most of the downed flyers spent their first weeks of captivity, enduring the peak of their horrific and grueling physical and mental torture. We are solemnly committed to ensuring the personal war for survival and sacrifice of these brave men shall never be forgotten.

The AHM is honored to be able to keep their legacy alive for future generations and look forward to the future opening of this gallery that will preserve their courage, valor, and bravery.
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2 days ago  ·  

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We will never forget. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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Celebrating the 75th Victory Over Japan day (VJ day). Honoring those who served and lost their lives for our freedom and liberty. We must remember. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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We have been making some interesting discoveries as we assemble the Panzer 1A. Pictures show the left rear swing arm with a bullet hole right through it. Looks like the bullet traveled through the arm and into a wheel rim. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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Restoration work is being done on the German 7.5mm IG18 artillery piece that will go into the War Clouds exhibit around the end of this week. The wooden spoke wheels indicate this cannon was pulled by a horse. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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Jacques Littlefield’s fascination with military vehicles began in childhood. From his earliest days, he studied and created intricate models of tanks and military machines. His first remote-controlled scale model tank was completed in college. Jacques acquired a full size military vehicle in 1975, a World War II era M3 Scout car. By 1998, his collection had grown to over 200 tanks and vehicles. To manage these, and to restore more, Littlefield established the Military Vehicle Technology Foundation in Portola Valley, California. Following a decade-long battle with cancer, Jacques died on January 7, 2009. Over his lifetime, Littlefield amassed the world’s largest privately held collection of tanks and military vehicles in the world.

Receiving this historically important and extensive collection was a tremendous honor for the Collings Foundation. Exhibiting these artifacts in the most meaningful way possible is our duty. We designed the new American Heritage Museum to fully engage people in understanding our turbulent past. In this remarkable place, American history will be explored, studied, and most of all, remembered. Through educational interpretation, and a chronologically arranged series of dioramas and exhibits, the American Heritage Museum will bring the history of our veterans to life.

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Museum Re-Opens Wednesday, July 8th, 2020

As a part of the Reopening Massachusetts Phase III, the American Heritage Museum will be re-opening to the public on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 and will be open Wednesday through Sunday from 10am to 5pm. All visitors will be required to wear face masks while visiting the indoor spaces per state requirements.