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HOLIDAY HOURS AT THE AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUMJust a reminder, we will be open on Wednesday, Nov. 24th but we will be closed on Thanksgiving Day - Thursday, Nov. 25th. We will be OPEN on Friday, Nov. 26th and open through the weekend (11/27-11/28) - so, if you're looking for an activity for visiting family, please make the AHM a destination!Another reminder that the AHM will be CLOSED to the general public on Saturday, December 4th and will be only open to ticket holders for the WWII Symposium that day. For more details about that event (tickets on sale until Nov 26) at www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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Saturday, December 4th, the American Heritage Museum will host a WWII symposium: Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy? The P-40 Tomahawk - world's last fully restored and flying fighter that survived the attack on Pearl Harbor - will be the backdrop. This is an exclusive catered event with a stellar line-up of speakers. Deadline for tickets is Friday, November 26th. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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We hope you will join us at the AHM this Friday for a talk by author Dr. Steven Eames on his book Rustic Warriors. Starts at 1:00 PM. Standard museum admission. For more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/speaker-series-rustic-warrior-by-dr-steven-eames/ ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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The American Heritage Museum welcomes our veteran community this coming Thursday, November 11th, in celebration of Veterans Day. Museum admission is free on Veterans Day for all veterans and active duty personnel from 10:00am to 5:00pm on Thursday. Please bring your VA ID card or DoD DD 214/215 for verification. Please join us at 11:00am for a special ceremony in the museum in remembrance of all who have served. Advance purchase of tickets is not necessary, please purchase or verify admission at the front desk. ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago  ·  

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*Special Event:WWII Symposium at AHM - December 4th.Pearl Harbor - Inevitable or Infamy?On December 7th, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor. The assault would plunge the United States into a second world war that ultimately resulted in the deaths of over 418,000 Americans and an unfathomable 70 to 80 million worldwide. Coined by President Roosevelt as the “day of infamy,” the attack on Pearl Harbor and declarations of war on the United States four days later by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy propelled the United States into a war on two sides of the world – the Pacific and European theaters.Now, 80 years later, the attacks on Pearl Harbor still invoke feelings of patriotism and sadness. Our country changed forever after December 7th, 1941. The history that leads to this pivotal moment and its aftermath continues to affect our world’s nations, democracies, and civic order.The American Heritage Museum will host an extraordinary symposium called “Pearl Harbor – Inevitable or Infamy.” During this exclusive day-long discussion we will explore what lead up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the major battles that ensued and its aftermath.This is a special event exclusive to symposium participants. Lunch will be served as well as coffee and refreshments and personal tours through the amazing American Heritage Museum are part of the event. For tickets and more information see: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/ihi-ahm-symposium-reconsidering-pearl-harbor/ ... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago  ·  

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Liberation


M8 Greyhound
– USA | ARMORED CAR

Liberation of Europe

The final battles of the European Theater of World War II as well as the German surrender to the Allies took place in late April and early May 1945. WWII in Europe lasted six long years, from 1939 to 1945, with American participation from December 1941 to May 1945. Europe was freed from Nazi rule. World War II was the last great global war and has long functioned as the conflict by which all other wars are judged. It is a conflict often represented as an  archetypal struggle between good and evil, but it was also a war of clashing national and imperial interests, material production, reduced inhibitions to destruction on all sides, and terrible means ranging from deliberate starvation of civilian populations via sea blockades, to aerial destruction of hundreds of cities, to deliberate genocides, that by the end, saw 75 million people killed. For all that, the Liberation of western Europe was also a triumph of morality and justice over the most evil, ruthless, and criminal regimes of the 20th century. The Liberation is also an enduring lesson in collaboration and cooperation in wartime by a winning military and political coalition, which overcame internal quarrels and differences in a shared effort.

As the war neared its end in Europe Allies came across numerous Nazi concentration camps filled with sick and starving prisoners. In every camp we found appalling scenes and the bodies of thousands who either died of starvation or were murdered. Majdanek near Lublin, Poland was the first camp liberated in July 1944, by the Red Army (most of the Nazi death camps were built in the east, and so were liberated in 1944-1945 by the advancing Red Army of the Soviet Union). Germans tried to cover up their atrocities by demolishing the camp, but parts of the gas chambers were left standing. When the Soviets overran Auschwitz in January 1945, only a few hundred prisoners remained, the rest having been forced onto one of many ‘death marches’ so that they could not bear witness to what had been done. Nearly 1 million Jewish men, women and children were murdered here along with others that were deemed “sub-human” or “useless mouths” or “enemies of the state” by the Nazis.

American forces would liberate concentration camps including Buchenwald, Dora-Mittelbau, Flossenburg, Dachau and Mauthausen. The Mauthausen work camp was used for extermination through labor. Many prisoners died hauling massive blocks of stone up the “stairs of death.” On May 3rd, 1945. Allies neared Mauthausen and its nearby sub-camp Gusen. Most Nazi SS camp guards had fled. On May 5th, a reconnaissance unit from the US Army arrived and liberated over 40,000 prisoners. The scene of death and starvation sickened even the most hardened soldiers. General Dwight Eisenhower was so affected by what he witnessed at the Ohrdurf concentration camp on April 12th, 1945, he refused to meet with German General Alfred Jodl and his aid until after they signed the unconditional surrender document at his headquarters in Reims, France on May 7th, 1945.

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OPEN INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND - Open Saturday, July 3rd and Sunday, July 4th from 10am to 5pm Daily

No Reservations Needed.