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Short video of the guys moving the M18 Hellcat out of the Crossing the Rhine exhibit. Getting ready for this weekend's WWII Tank Demonstration. ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago  ·  

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A little #TankTuesday teaser to lure you out to our Tank Demo Weekend on Sat, Aug 13 & Sun, Aug 14 in Hudson, MA! See four of the five in the video below plus our German Hetzer and OT-810 half track! Schedule and tickets at ahmus.me/tdw822 ...#worldoftanks #wwii #ww2 #worldwar2 #worldwarii #m4sherman #m24chaffee #m26pershing #m18hellcat #tanks #americanheritagemuseum #hudsonma #hudsonmass #visitma ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago  ·  

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Getting several of the tanks ready for this weekend's Tank Demonstration. See these tanks operating with narration highlighting their history and theaters of operation. The Historic Aircraft Hangar and Classic Car Barn will also be open. Hope you can make it! Please tell your friends. More information: www.americanheritagemuseum.org/event/tank-demonstration-weekend-august-2022/ ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago  ·  

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Every year in early October we host an extraordinary WWII re-enactment at the AHM (Oct. 8th & 9th, 2022). There are over 350 Allied and Axis re-enactors who participate in "Battle for the Airfield." One of the most compelling presentations we host during this living history event is our WWII Veteran roundtable discussion. WWII veterans from all branches of service and rank come to talk about what they were doing during the war. We are looking for more WWII veterans to participate. Do you know an able WWII veteran who would like to join us? If so, please email Hunter Chaney at hchaney@collingsfoundation.org. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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As a follow-up to our post this morning about the start of construction on the Hanoi Hilton Exhibit honoring our Vietnam War POWs - take a moment to watch our video to understand why we are doing this... youtu.be/o7cDvXH_Yls ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

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Liberation


M8 Greyhound
– USA | ARMORED CAR

Liberation of Europe

The final battles of the European Theater of World War II as well as the German surrender to the Allies took place in late April and early May 1945. WWII in Europe lasted six long years, from 1939 to 1945, with American participation from December 1941 to May 1945. Europe was freed from Nazi rule. World War II was the last great global war and has long functioned as the conflict by which all other wars are judged. It is a conflict often represented as an  archetypal struggle between good and evil, but it was also a war of clashing national and imperial interests, material production, reduced inhibitions to destruction on all sides, and terrible means ranging from deliberate starvation of civilian populations via sea blockades, to aerial destruction of hundreds of cities, to deliberate genocides, that by the end, saw 75 million people killed. For all that, the Liberation of western Europe was also a triumph of morality and justice over the most evil, ruthless, and criminal regimes of the 20th century. The Liberation is also an enduring lesson in collaboration and cooperation in wartime by a winning military and political coalition, which overcame internal quarrels and differences in a shared effort.

As the war neared its end in Europe Allies came across numerous Nazi concentration camps filled with sick and starving prisoners. In every camp we found appalling scenes and the bodies of thousands who either died of starvation or were murdered. Majdanek near Lublin, Poland was the first camp liberated in July 1944, by the Red Army (most of the Nazi death camps were built in the east, and so were liberated in 1944-1945 by the advancing Red Army of the Soviet Union). Germans tried to cover up their atrocities by demolishing the camp, but parts of the gas chambers were left standing. When the Soviets overran Auschwitz in January 1945, only a few hundred prisoners remained, the rest having been forced onto one of many ‘death marches’ so that they could not bear witness to what had been done. Nearly 1 million Jewish men, women and children were murdered here along with others that were deemed “sub-human” or “useless mouths” or “enemies of the state” by the Nazis.

American forces would liberate concentration camps including Buchenwald, Dora-Mittelbau, Flossenburg, Dachau and Mauthausen. The Mauthausen work camp was used for extermination through labor. Many prisoners died hauling massive blocks of stone up the “stairs of death.” On May 3rd, 1945. Allies neared Mauthausen and its nearby sub-camp Gusen. Most Nazi SS camp guards had fled. On May 5th, a reconnaissance unit from the US Army arrived and liberated over 40,000 prisoners. The scene of death and starvation sickened even the most hardened soldiers. General Dwight Eisenhower was so affected by what he witnessed at the Ohrdurf concentration camp on April 12th, 1945, he refused to meet with German General Alfred Jodl and his aid until after they signed the unconditional surrender document at his headquarters in Reims, France on May 7th, 1945.

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MUSEUM CLOSING AT 3:00PM TODAY (Sat. June 4th)

The American Heritage Museum will be closing early at 3:00pm today, Saturday, June 4th, for a private event. The museum will be open normal hours (10am to 5pm) on Sunday, June 5th.